UPDATES AND STUFF

Current Mood:
cried in every class and am crying now

❝ If flowers can
teach themselves
how to bloom after
winter passes,
so can you. ❞
- (via hopelesslyhealing)

❝ It’s 1am and all I can think about is how it would feel to wrap you up in my arms and kiss your forehead and fall asleep to the tune of your heartbeat ❞
- r.s (via hotprosperity)

You know that feeling you get when you really like someone and you hold their hand for the first time? How it just feels so satisfying to know they have the same feelings for you? It feels like a sexual release. It’s such a light, timid hand hold. Like, they can let go easily if they want and you can too but you both try so hard to hold onto each other so lightly. It just feels so innocent and right. Literally one of the best feelings in the world.

You know that feeling you get when you really like someone and you hold their hand for the first time? How it just feels so satisfying to know they have the same feelings for you? It feels like a sexual release. It’s such a light, timid hand hold. Like, they can let go easily if they want and you can too but you both try so hard to hold onto each other so lightly. It just feels so innocent and right. Literally one of the best feelings in the world.

humorinrecovery:

Super incredibly maddening thing about mental illness:

Fighting your ass off to live a normal life and function as well as you can, and instead of getting credit and having people be proud of you for all the efforts you’re making, having people use your apparently normal behavior as a reason to invalidate you and think you weren’t that sick to begin with.

It takes a lot of badassery to act this normal, but the effort is all invisible 

theprosaicmoments:

@thestacksband  (at Silver Creek Beer Garden And Grille)

theprosaicmoments:

@thestacksband (at Silver Creek Beer Garden And Grille)

bevgodsgirls:

frigerator:

I support thick thighs

Thick thighs support me

iridessence:

"Down on the West Coast, they got their icons.
Their silver starlets, their Queens of Saigon.”

❝ Telling a young girl she can’t wear what she wants because it’s not appropriate encourages the idea that men’s reactions should dictate society’s norms, and that all women are meta-Eves, tempting and ensnaring men with our sultry-eyed gaze. My parents’ culture is steeped in patriarchy, in the philosophy of the one-step machismo machine, where there is just one kind of man, and two kinds of women: the angel and the whore. These limited ideas of masculinity breed men who want ownership of women. ❞
- Fariha Roison (via girl-violence)

fascinates:

people who make you feel better about yourself when you’re sad are so important 

alexwaepenwifebunny:

It’s not that i want equality with men, it is that i don’t want there to be men.

❝ Whole Foods is a point of entry into a new version of American whiteness, one which leans on a pseudo recognition of diversity through sanitized food presentation. It offers a new order of “otherness” in which the other is a pleasant-looking piece of food, totally safe, and with a pedigree. Within the Whole Foods’ bubble we are turned instantly sophisticated, and the store becomes the place where we can self-indulge in notions of cosmopolitan openness to world products and political struggles. To buy an avocado “with a background” ends up, dangerously, filling the space of our urge for political awareness. The store did the math for us, as well as all the thinking, so we can “shop with confidence” and just relax.

The whole process does something rather particular: It creates the illusion of an “independent” understanding within the larger implications of corporate intervention in defining a food’s background. In establishing a perimeter of commercial values based on social responsibility, Whole Foods depoliticizes us. Worse, for those already sinking into the hybrid life of a world without politics, it offers a parachute, a sort of immunity: “I shop here so, by extension, I know a thing or two about social awareness.”

Whole Foods unavoidably widens the gap between people who have everything and people who have nothing: How can super expensive foods that look like an invention of Edward Weston’s camera - that the majority of the world cannot afford, or would laugh about - be synonymous with social responsibility? This is truly a modern enigma.

The recent situation with quinoa, the “hot” and “trendy” new grain that we are suddenly unable to live without - and without which we are suddenly missing essential nutrients to keep us alive - is case in point. Paola Flores, filing for the AP from La Paz, Bolivia, reports that “[t]he scramble to grow more (quinoa) is prompting Bolivian farmers to abandon traditional land management practices, endangering the fragile ecosystem of the arid highlands, agronomists say.” A quinoa emergency, then, at the bulk bins. A separate exposé published in the Guardian goes even further: “[T]here is an unpalatable truth to face for those of us with a bag of quinoa in the larder. The appetite of countries such as ours for this grain has pushed up prices to such an extent that poorer people in Peru and Bolivia, for whom it was once a nourishing staple food, can no longer afford to eat it. Imported junk food is cheaper. In Lima, quinoa now costs more than chicken.” Whether we blame vegans or hipsters or the organic food movement or a lack of appropriate trade regulations, the troubling truth about quinoa represents that repetitive drama between the West and rest in which our voracious consumption depletes yet another land and another people.

Whole Foods widens the gaps, and it does so in the most subtle and displacing manner, giving us an environment (the actually sanitized, spotless physical space) that is the embodiment of an elite (yet perceived as “open,” especially through the chain’s less pricey “360” product line) that finds itself at home within a soulless, sterilized experiences. The notion of gentrification has been surpassed, attaining the space of a perennial state of mind. This is where even an apple turns into an object/jewelry of desire, not of need, or at least of normality. In that sense, Whole Foods is simply the last piece in the long, familiar chain of shifting perceptions in neo-capitalistic societies that exploded after the Second World War, in which the creation and multiplication of desires is central to the self-preservation of the system.

- "Shipwrecked in Whole Foods" (via femmeanddangerous)

elegantly-tasteless:

skeletoncrew4444:

Younger gentrifiers love to make being poor some kind of trendy lifestyle of choice and romanticize the fuck out of it while actively and knowingly shitting on the people their stealing resources, homes, and livelihoods from. 

Hipster culture in a nutshell

honeynotmoney:

"I’m trying to be brave ‘cause when I’m brave other people feel brave, but I feel like my heart is caving in."

-Kimya Dawson, Caving In